Journal Week pt 2: Nicole Nogoy and the Data Publishing Quest

We’re happy to welcome our second curator for Journal Week here at Real Scientists –Nicole Nogoy (@Medi_Cole) has a PhD in Natural Sciences (Cardiovascular Molecular MedicineNN_blog post) from the University of Goettingen, Germany and obtained her BSc Hons in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and Physiology from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Nicole has over a decade of experience in the STM publishing industry – most notably having launched and been Managing Editor of Genome Medicine, as well as the Commissioning Editor of several review journals for the Future Science Group. Nicole is now Editor with GigaScience having joined the team in 2012. She is also an Open Science, Open Data and reproducible research advocate.  You can read more about Nicole in her own words below.

I have always been fascinated with science, in particular health science, since I was young – quite different, since I come from a family of architects, designers, diplomats, and artists (everyone thought I would end up pursuing one of those professions). I attended a university open day during my last year of high school and saw some very enthusiastic lecturers talk about how exciting science is – in particular, it was the biochemistry and biology lecturers that convinced me.

I was half way through my PhD in Cardiovascular Molecular Medicine when I realized I didn’t want to pursue a career in research/ academia. I had a ‘light bulb moment”: I didn’t LOVE science, I LIKED it. I wasn’t thrilled (and am still not) about the “publish and perish” culture which still strongly persists in Academia today. I did a lot of research into different careers I could pursue with my science background – I even considered becoming a Patent Lawyer, but was turned down because I had “missed the biotech wave” and at that time, firms were keen on hiring people with engineering backgrounds. A good friend then mentioned science publishing and put me in contact with someone she knew in London – I sent my CV, got flown to London for an interview, got the job and there was no turning back.

I love working in science publishing – I love the fact that I can continue to be part of science, but not in the lab with the pressure of publishing. I enjoy interacting with researchers and authors, and have heard some amazing talks by science leaders. I love that I’m continuing to learn about different areas of research – plus the travel to various conferences around the world is a bonus! What keeps me in publishing is the fact that I work for a journal, GigaScience that has a mission which I strongly believe in – Open Science, and fighting the reproducible crisis; which unfortunately, science and publishing suffers from.

I’m an Editor at GigaScience. I handle manuscripts and find reviewers, but I also commission manuscripts and help with further developing the journal by finding and establishing new collaborations/projects with different research communities. I also establish marketing exchanges with conferences, as well as thematic series. I’m an advocate for open science and involved with the RRID and Annotate all Knowledge (Hypothes.is) working groups at FORCE11. Reproducibility in science is a huge and ongoing problem with huge impact (I can go on and on about this) – thanks to the growing number of studies (http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124) reporting the inability to reproduce previously published findings. One way to overcome the problem is changing the way people conduct and publish research – adopt open science. GigaScience is always trying to push the boundaries of reproducible research, adapting to the challenges presented by data-intensive research. Help us improve the reproducibility crisis and promote, practice and publish more open research objects (data, software tools and workflows).

My ideal day off would involve spending time with my family and young son, cooking/ baking up a storm, drinking wine and eating cheese, including time out with a good book.

 

Please welcome Nicole to Real Scientists!

 

 

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