I am a real doctor and they are real worms they are actual worms: thanks and farewell Philipp Schiffer

Philipp Schiffer (@evolgenomology) joined Real Scientists at the end of February and is a Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at University College London researching evolution based on the development of marine worms.

https://twitter.com/realscientists/status/836157537355509760

It sure has it’s moments Philipp!

And here’s the cool little worms that Philipp researches

https://twitter.com/realscientists/status/835899799182458881

Philipp is also lucky enough to work on evolution in the very same building where Charles Darwin once lived – how’s that for inspiration!

https://twitter.com/realscientists/status/836491752076902400

Philipp kindly filled out our post-curation survey, and you can read his thoughts about the week below.

In general terms, how did you find your week as a curator?

Quite enjoyable, but also exhausting.

It can be a shock talking to so many. Did you find the sudden rush of interactions (good and bad) daunting?

Indeed it came as a shock, especially getting instant (strong) interactions. I wouldn’t call it daunting though, more fascinating and a bit exhausting, but really mostly fascinating and intriguing.

What were the highlights? Were there any lowlights?

I really learnt a lot about humankind, science communication, and communication in general.
I still feel bad for having failed one particular person whose tweets and story I should have handled differently. There I wasn’t prepared and experienced enough and thus couldn’t decouple this story from the general discussion. So my lowlight is failing there.

Is there anything you wanted to get out of / do on the RS account that you didn’t manage to fit in?

Oh, there might be many things, but being in the present most of the time, there is no need to linger in the past. In other words, all fine.

Did you have a plan? If so, did you stick to it?

I had a rough layout for the week, in terms of starting with topics important to science, scientists, and society, then moving over to presenting our group, then my projects, and in the end going back to current important topics in science, which are not scientific findings. Indeed, I found it hard to make cuts and say, “OK, now to something else”.

Do you have any tips or advice for future RS curators?

As a scientist, have an opinion (be it on your science or being in science), defend that opinion with rational arguments (and data), but listen to reasonable critique. Listening and reflecting is very important. Keep a cool head and try to not to shoot back instantly (which is not necessarily what I achieved).

 

Thanks once again Philipp from all of us here at RealScientists HQ. If you missed anything from his week, the tweets are all collated at the following link.

 

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